"Stairway to Heaven"

Located primarily in the mountain areas in the North of Vietnam, the terraced rice fields are called the “Stairway to Heaven” by many people. These are the result of really amazing work over a hundred years by local hill tribes, mostly the H’mong people. Every year, between September and October, the terraced rice fields put on a show of picturesque harvest colours. The curving terraces, although man-made, appear to be in complete harmony with the landscape, creating a hypnotic patterning across the hills and valleys.
Mù Cang Chải DistrictMù Cang Chải District©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved Mù Cang Chải DistrictMù Cang Chải District©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved
Mù Cang Chải, a rural district in northern Vietnam’s Yên Bái Province
Yên Bái ProvinceYên Bái Province©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved Yên Bái ProvinceYên Bái Province©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved
Different from rice cultivation on the plain, the Vietnam terraced rice fields can be cultivated with only one crop per year, normally from June to October. Starting in September, the fields start changing colour from green to yellow in preparation for the new harvest. 
Yên Bái ProvinceYên Bái Province©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved
Than Uyên DistrictThan Uyên District©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved

Than Uyên District

The man-made terraces are carved into the mountains, with rice fields stacked in increasing gradients to create fluid lines.
Than Uyên DistrictThan Uyên District©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved
Than Uyên DistrictThan Uyên District©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved Than Uyên DistrictThan Uyên District©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved
Hoang Su Phi District, Ha Giang ProvinceHoang Su Phi District, Ha Giang Province©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved
Hoàng Su Phì District, Ha Giang Province
Hoàng Su Phì is among the most untouched areas of Ha Giang Province of Vietnam. The district was separated from the mainstream society until very recently. Hoàng Su Phì is a rural district of Ha Giang province in the northeastern region of Vietnam. Hoang Su Phi is famous for its rice fields terraces, especially on the road between Hoang Su Phi and Xin Man, where those terraces are classified as a National Heritage by the Vietnamese Government.
Muong Hoa Valley, Sa Pa, Lào Cai ProvinceMuong Hoa Valley, Sa Pa, Lào Cai Province©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved

Muong Hoa Valley, Sa Pa, Lào Cai ProvinceMuong Hoa Valley, Sa Pa, Lào Cai Province©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved


Sa Pa, Lào Cai Province
Established as a hill station by the French in 1922, Sapa today is the tourism centre of the northwest. Sapa is oriented to make the most of the spectacular views emerging on clear days; it overlooks a plunging valley, with mountains towering above on all sides. Views of this epic scenery are often subdued by thick mist rolling across the peaks.

 

Sa Pa, Lào Cai ProvinceSa Pa, Lào Cai Province©Kieron Nelson 2017 "Vanishing Cultures Photography" All rights reserved

 

 

 


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